Tag Archives: Sif

Days of Thunder – January 1968 The Mighty Thor #148

 “Let there Be… Chaos!”
Is there no limit to the thrills so lavishly bestowed upon us by… Stan (The Man) Lee and Jack (King) Kirby or to the awesome assistance of Vince Colletta, Inker, and Sam Rosen, Letterer?

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With his bolt, Odin’s has stripped Loki, Sif and Balder of their godly power just as he had previously done to Thor. After Odin chastises them, Loki scampers off. Sif wants to kick Loki’s ass but Thor doesn’t think it would be sporting.

Thor and his friends retreat to Doctor Blake’s office to discuss what to do next. They order some take out. Thor actually pays for his food with Blake’s money. The secret identity thing really isn’t working for Thor.

Meanwhile, Loki rents a seedy room, takes off his coat and helmet and tries to contact his old ally, the Norn Queen. He telepathically petitions her to grant him “power enow to vanquish all who oppose my will!”.  It is at this moment that a crowbar-wielding villain named the Wrecker bursts into Loki’s room.

The Wrecker is a talented criminal who prides himself on his ability to use a crowbar like a scalpel. He had spotted Loki in the window and judged him by his clothes to be a supervillain, and thus to probably have some loot.  As far as he is concerned, that is a compelling reason to knowck out Loki with his crowbar, before putting on Loki’s helmet, because who wouldn’t try on that helmet if it was just sitting there?

This is how the Norn Queen comes to imbue the Wrecker with great Asgardian power.  She mistakes the helmeted figure to be Loki.

When Loki comes to, the Wrecker returns the helmet before using his new power to zap the evil one back to Asgard.

Later, as Thor is trying to explain television to his friends, they catch a news bulletin showing that the Wrecker is rampaging through the city. The three warriors track him down but the villain uses his power to zap Sif and Balder back to Asgard as he did Loki. He wants to fight Thor one-on-one.

First Appearance: The Wrecker

Days of Thunder – December 1967 The Mighty Thor #147

“The Wrath of Odin!”
Another smashing super-spectacular by: Stan (The Man) Lee and Jack (King) Kirby/ Embellishment: Vince Colletta/ Lettering: Artie Simek

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Thor saves Princess Python and returns the Bull to its rightful place before turning himself over to the police. Princess Python, moved by Thor’s act of heroism, tells the police that Thor is an innocent dupe before escaping arrest with the rest of the Circus of Crime.

While Thor is being arrested and placed in lock up, his brother is being granted parole. Odin has decided that the time is right to release Loki from his imprisonment in Limbo.  Loki, now back in his original big horned helmet outfit, wastes no time, immediately heading straight to Earth to bail out his brother.  Er, in a villainous way.

Loki has disguised himself before freeing Thor, but it is not long before Thor sees through his brother’s deception, at which point Loki proceeds to beat the crap out of Thor. With Thor’s godly power removed, Loki is more than a match for him. Loki can, at long last, just wale on his hated brother. Just beat on him and beat on him and beat on him.

Loki has battered his brother into submission and it about to issue the death blow when Sif and Balder arrive to save Thor from Loki, despite Odin’s command that they leave Earth for Asgard.

None of this goes unwitnessed by Odin, who is apoplectic with rage. He can barely choke out his angry words: “What monumental kingly defiance is this??! First Thor– Then Lok– Now– I behold Balder– And fair Sif! Disobedience breeds anarchy– yet, they have chosen to disobey! No matter their motives– my punishment must be swift– and terrible! And by the power of yon bolt I hurl, so shall it be!”

Days of Thunder – November 1967 The Mighty Thor #146

“–If The Thunder Be Gone!”
A Stan (The Man) Lee and Jack (King) Kirby festival of fabulous Fantasy! Delineation: Vince Colletta/ Lettering: Artie Simek

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Thor makes his circus debut, wearing a cheap knockoff Thor costume supplied by the Ringmaster. They perform their show and Thor does okay. In the Audience, Thor spies Jane Foster on a date and he is gladdened to see that she has moved on.

After the show, the heist begins. It is like Ocean’s 11 but with a clown and a snake and a former Thunder God. The goal of the heist is a massive 20-ton statue of a golden bull, showcased in a local museum. Thor’s job is to lift it.

As the gang makes their getaway, some guards catch up with the crew and attempt to shoot the fleeing criminals. The gunshots somehow lift the hypnosis from Thor’s mind, but in his disorientation, he drops the bull, pinning Princess Python! As Thor wonders what do to, the guards charge into the room, guns blazing!

Days of Thunder – October 1967 The Mighty Thor #145

The Mighty Thor! “Abandoned On Earth!”
Produced by Marvel’s peerless purveyors of pandemonious  pageantry: Smilin’ Stan Lee and Jolly Jack Kirby/ Embellished by Valiant Vince Colletta/ Lettered by Swingin’ Sammy Rosen

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Odin returns victorious from his cosmic battle, bringing with him Forsung’s corpse. He crushes the no-longer Living Talisman in his fist and gives a fiery speech:  “Death to the foes of Asgard! The Golden Realm shall e’er endure! I have spoken! Odin is the power supreme! Odin is the word.. and the way and the wonder! Let all who live now know them this… Odin is just! Odin is merciful!! And yet…
Odin is a vengeful liege.. Odin is an angry liege… Odin is now and forever supreme! And woe to him who strays from righteousness!… For the rage of the All-Father is truly eternal and his judgement is all-consuming!”

And with that he consigns the two remaining Enchanters to the Lost Limbo of Infinity Unending.  In these pages, Odin has been shown to be angry, many, many times. This is the first time we have seen him wrathful and it is magnificent to behold.

Odin now commands the Asgardians on Earth to return home. Balder and Sif comply but Thor begs to stay.

Thor picked the wrong time to back-talk Odin. His father grants his request but severs his connection to the power of Asgard.  Odin also disenchants Thor’s hammer. Without Mjolnir’s enchantment, Thor cannot fly, cannot command the storm, the hammer will not return to him, and he cannot transform into Doctor Blake.

Thor passes out from the shock of this change.  Later, he is awakened by Olsen the janitor who discovers him on the floor of Blake’s office.

Thor soon realizes he must make a new life for himself on Earth. He must find human clothes with which to blend in, and find a job.  Presumably, he will live in Blake’s home.

Stranded on Earth, naturally Thor decides to become a circus strong man performing under the stage name of “Thor”. Unfortunately for him, the circus he joins is the Circus of Crime.

Led by the Ringmaster who possesses a hypnotic top hat, the Circus of Crime also boast in their number the Gambino Twins, sinister acrobats; Princess Python, a deadly snake charmer; the Human Cannonball, a bulleteer; and The Crafty Clown, a clown who is crafty. They use their circus powers for criminality and they intend
to hypnotize Thor into helping them!

First Appearance: The Circus of Crime, The Ringmaster, The Gambino Twins, Princess Python, The Human Cannonball, The Crafty Clown

Days of Thunder – September 1967 The Mighty Thor #144

The Mighty Thor! “This Battleground Earth!”
Conceived in grandeur and produced in majesty by: Stan (The Man) Lee and Jack (King) Kirby/ Embellished by: Vince Colletta/ Lettered by: Sam Rosen

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Fight time! The Enchanters Magnir and Brona want to fight Thor without any interference, so they clear the area of mortals by releasing a ring of Demon Mist, something I assume kills all the humans. Then they separate Thor from his friends by lifting the ground upon which they stand into the sky.

With Thor isolated, so begins perhaps the toughest fight yet to transpire in the pages of The Mighty Thor.  The Enchanters, giant beings with great strength and greater magic, can transform themselves into energy or engulf themselves in smoke, they are strong and able warriors, and they outmatch Thor two-to-one.

It’s a glorious battle, with a lot of back and forth. At a key moment in the fight, Magnir catches Thor’s hammer mid-swing, wrests it from Thor’s hand, heats it with the heat of a million suns, and throws it back at Thor. That’s what Thor is dealing with. He stands his ground, but he is not winning.

While Thor fights these Enchanters, Forsung, the eldest of the three brothers, has come to Asgard itself to challenge Odin in ritual combat.

As the issuer of the challenge, Forsung proclaims that, “The victor’s prize shall be… the all-powerful Odin-Sword, which doth repose within yon vault!”
“But, know you, Forsung… When the Odin-Sword moves, it well may signal the end of the world!” replies Odin
“No Matter! Twill be the end of thy world… not mine!”

Those are the stakes. The nature of the battle is this: Both men shall clasp Odin’s Scepter of Power. Through it shall flow both combatant’s power, battering at the both of them. He who can hold on longest shall be the victor. In addition, for this battle Forsung shall forgo the use of his mystic talisman, while Odin shall withdraw the Power of All Asgardians, which is apparently a thing that he draws upon.

This cosmic battle of pure willpower engulfs the two combatants in a brilliant fireball of universe-shaking energy that propels them through the endless bounds of space. As they hurtle through the void, they smash through planets, and create new suns through the power of their divine energies. Theirs is a battle that transcends space, time and thought itself.

There is a side-effect of this cosmic battle.  When Odin and Forsung renounced their divine powers it severed the connection to the power of godhood for Thor and presumably all other Asgardians, and has done the equivalent to the Enchanters. Without their magics, the Enchanters are no longer able to keep Balder and Sif away from the fight and soon Brona and Magnir are defeated by the three Asgardian.  However, having lost their godhead, Thor, Sif, and Balder are trapped on Midgard.

First appearance: Demon Mist

Days of Thunder – August 1967 The Mighty Thor #143

The Mighty Thor! “–And, Soon Shall Come: The Enchanters!”
Produced in Living Color by: Stan (The Man) Lee and Jack (King) Kirby/ Embellished by: Bill Everett/ Lettered by: Sam Rosen/ True Believers All!

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Thor had returned to Earth to sort out his life as Doctor Donald Blake, and yet, when this issue begins, we find Thor sitting alone in a soda shop. It seems as though Blake is a man with no friends that Thor does not like being.  One wonders what the point of Blake is.

Once again, Thor makes a point of not paying for his goods and services before returning to Blake’s practice where he does some doctoring.

Meanwhile in Ringsfjord, Sif and Balder encounter the Enchanters, three gigantic men named Magnir, Forsung, and Brona. Each is clad in crazy Kirby armor, with a strange face on the chest: The Living Talisman.

Sif again has to explain to Balder that she is actually a real warrior, not a woman playing dress up, “I say thee nay, my lord! Though I be woman born, my blade is true… my arm is swift!” How long is she going to have to justify her existence?

The Enchanters declare their intent to humble Odin.  They then  attack Sif and Balder with crafted warriors and with the ground itself. Eventually the heroes retreat using Sif’s power to bypass time and space, which is apparently a thing all goddesses have.

Balder and Sif travel to Midgard to find Thor. They are unable to find him by detecting his aura because he is in Blake form. Instead, they ask a passing police officer if he knows where Thor is and the officer tells them that Doctor Blake might know. They visit Blake and he reveals himself to them as Thor. Meanwhile, two of the Enchanters have followed the Asgardians to Earth.

Also, Balder is falling in love with Sif. Uh oh!

First Appearance: Magnir, Forsung, Brona, The Living Talisman

Days of Thunder – July 1967 The Mighty Thor #142

The Mighty Thor! “The Scourge of the Super Skrull!”
A Modern, majestic Masterwork by Stan (The Man) Lee and Jack (King) Kirby/ Embellished by Vince Colletta/ Lettered by Artie Simek

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The character of the Super-Skrull is a character that has previously been introduced in the pages of Fantastic Four, the worlds greatest comic magazine. The Skrulls are a a race of green shape-changing aliens from the Skrull Galaxy who have repeatedly clashed with the Fantastic Four in attempting to conquer the Earth. On one occasion, the Fantastic Four hypnotized some Skrulls into believing they were cows.  On another, the Skrulls murdered the father of two of the team’s members.  Most recently, the leader of the Skrulls has promised to stop trying to conquer Earth.

One of the Skrulls has been modified by Skrull science so as to possess the powers of all four members of the Fantastic Four, in addition to his normal shape-changing powers. This grants him the power of flight, super-strength, invisibility, spontaneous flame creation, and stretchiness.  It is he who is known as the Super-Skrull.  After twice being defeated by the Fantastic Four, he has returned to his people.

Still disembodied and exiled, but again self-aware, and for some reason now back in his classic garb, Loki is back to his old tricks. He finds the Super-Skrull, now banished to an unglamorous space patrol assignment, and uses his powers of suggestion to compel the Skrull to attack Thor as the beginning of a campaign to conquer Asgard itself.

The Super-Skrull fights Thor and loses. Thor uses Mjolnir to create an Anti-Force to fling the Super-Skrull away from Earth.

Meanwhile Balder and Sif make plans to visit the land of Ringsfjord to fight the deadly Enchanters. Balder tries to convince Sif to stay away from the danger, but Sif ain’t having it, asking it “Is my arm not skillful as any warrior? Is my eye not as keen? Is my courage any less true?” It is unfortunate that all the men around Sif have to be portrayed as sexist asses in order to elevate Sif.

First Appearance: Mjolnir’s Anti-Force

Days of Thunder – May 1967 The Mighty Thor #140

The Mighty Thor! “The Growing Man!”
Conceived and created by the noblest collaborative combo in comicdom: Stan (The Man) Lee and Jack (King) Kirby/ Inking by: Vince Colletta/ Lettering by: Sam Rosen

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Fresh from his victory in the Great Troll War, the Warlord of Asgard is ready to return to Earth. Sif wants to accompany him but Thor gives her the brush off. He claims that his heroing on Earth is man’s work. Even after Sif shoots that down as a load of bull, he still insists on going by himself.

Thor has started to think about all that has gone on recently and he is a confused god. He really likes Sif but he remembers that he until very recently felt that way about Jane. He wonders if Odin altered his brain to make him move on from Jane to Sif or if Sif is really that awesome. It is very confusing to him. One thing is for sure, Doctor Donald Blake’s life has gone to shit. Thor decides that what is called for is to rebuild what he has let fall apart.

He returns to Earth and once again transforms into Doctor Blake. Apparently, he has physician friends and apparently they filled in during his absence. He tries to get his files in order, discussing his return with Olsen the janitor.

Meanwhile, archaeologists have discovered a living man who was the size of a doll when first found, but who has steadily grown larger and larger whenever he is touched by another person. He wakes and goes on a rampage, soon becoming the size of a small mountain.

This Growing Man is alarmed for he does not know his purpose. He seeks his master so that he can be told what his purpose is. This is a poignant and philosophical and undeveloped notion.

It turns out that the Growing Man is  a Stimuloid created by Kang the Conquerer and was hidden in Kang’s past to serve as a sleeper agent for attacking his enemies in the future. Unfortunately he was awoken too soon.  Kang has thus returned to the primitive 20th century so that he might re-shrink his weapon.

Thor tracks down the Stimuloid and oddly is able to recognize him as being one of Kang’s creations from the far future, which is odd since none of Thor’s past on-page interactions with Kang have involved Stimuloids. There are any number of ways Thor could have picked up this knowledge but it is still strange.

Thor fights Kang and the Stimuloid until they retreat to Kang’s time machine. Before they can escape, Thor throws Mjolnir (here spelled “Mjolnar”) so hard that it spins around the time machine at a speed greater than light, trapping the time machine in a Universal Infinity Vortex, causing a cataclysmic displacement trapping Kang and his Stimuloid beyond all time and place.

First Appearance: Stimuloids, The Universal Infinity Vortex, Olsen the Janitor

Days of Thunder – April 1967 The Mighty Thor #139

The Mighty Thor! “To Die Like a God!”
A Peerless, Pictorial Pageant, Painstakingly Produced with Perfectly Pardonable Pride by: Stan Lee and Jack Kirby/ Inked with the Prowess of Vice Colletta/ Lettered with the Pen-Points of Sam Rosen

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Thor, separated from his hammer, is desperately afraid of becoming Don Blake with no way to turn back into Thor. His solution is to, as Blake, throw himself in front of a train and hope that he would maybe appear in Valhalla as Thor. However, Sif has a less psychologically revealing plan. She simply removes Thor from Earth’s orbit. The sixty second rule only applies on Earth and once they leave under the power of Sif’s vaguely defined Goddess Magic, Thor will stay Thor no matter how hammerless he may stay.

Soon, the two of them storm the stronghold of the Trolls. Thor tries to send Sif away due to her womanliness and she tells him nuts to that. At long last we get to see Sif kick some serious ass alongside Thor.

Meanwhile, Ulik the Troll has used Orikal’s technology to create a duplicate of Thor’s hammer. Not only can he lift it, but he can hold Thor’s hammer also, which is most likely also a result of Orikal’s power. He does not hold it for long before Thor summons it to his person and then the two enemies have a hammer-fight.

The fighting leads the two enemies to the pit of fire where Orikal is being held. Ulik follows them, but in a twist, instead of fighting the Asgardians, he tries to kill the prisoner from another universe, as he is jealous of the favor King Geirrodur gives it.

Thor defeats Ulik and frees Orikal, who immediately departs. After Ulik goes down, Sif retrieves the hammer that is theoretically as powerful as Mjolnir but without the can-only-be-held-by-Thor limitation.

With Ulik defeated and Orikal freed, Thor gets Geirrodur to agree to surrender.

First Appearance: Duplicate Mjolnir

Days of Thunder – March 1967: The Mighty Thor #138

The Mighty Thor! “The Flames of Battle!”
Garnished With Grandeur by Stan (The Man) Lee and Jack (King) Kirby/ Inked by Vince (The Prince) Colletta/ Lettered by: Artie (The Smartie) Simek

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Thor has returned to Earth so that he might find the Lady Sif. Of course, all Immortals can detect each other due to their auras of free flowing electrons (last illustrated in issue #108), but once Thor is in the rough vicinity, he turns himself into Doctor Blake so as to travel in a less conspicuous fashion. Even in his human form, he can still detect Sif.

But as he approaches, The Trolls, who are hiding beneath the streets of New York, use their Molecular Disperser to pull Doctor Blake through the sidewalk into the ground, quickly separating him from his cane. However, Blake wastes no time in tricking a Troll into tapping it on the ground, initiating his Thor transformation.

Here, it is strongly implied that Blake needed to touch the cane as it hit the ground for the transformation to work, but of course no such contact was necessary in issue #105. Possibly this is enough of a corner case that Blake forgot the rules of transformation, especially plausible given how little he transforms these days. Or perhaps, once upon a time the transformation could be triggered by anyone but now that the wielder of the hammer has become truly more Thor than Blake, the switch can only be brought about by Thor/Blake’s own hand.

As Thor grabs his hammer he cries “To me, my enchanted mallet!! To thine avenging master, eternal Mjolnir!” This is the first time in these pages that Thor has referred to his hammer by name.

Meanwhile on Asgard, the Trolls are doing well in their war efforts, owed in no small part to the counsel of a mysterious advisor named Orikal. Orikal is a giant strange visitor from another universe held captive in volcanic flame by Geirrodur king of the trolls. Orikal posesses the Infinite Eye, which allows it to see all things in this world.  They pose such a threat that Odin fears for the fate of Asgard.

Thor beats on Ulik with Mjolnir. Thor is winning the fight but during a lull in the combat he sets down his hammer while he attempts to free Sif. This gives Ulik enough time to use a strange artifact called the Orb of Orikal.  The Orb ensnares Mjolnir, trapping it in within.

The strange sorcery of Orikal overrides the Uru magics of the hammer allowing Ulik and his troll bretheren to retreat via dimensional tunnel with Thor’s enchanted mallet. This leaves Thor on Earth with mere seconds before he will revert to Blake.

First appearance: Orikal, the Orb of Orikal, the name “Mjolnir”

Days of Thunder – February 1967: The Mighty Thor #137

The Mighty Thor “The Thunder God and The Troll!”
In all the unmeasurable universe, surely there be none, save Stan Lee and Jack Kirby who could create such wonderment! And, never again shall we see the like of Vince Colletta, Inker and Sam Rosen, Letterer

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Thor and his new girlfriend Sif are enjoying time with each other, tossing weapons, talking like Shakespeare, doing the things one does when in the early stages of limerence. All too soon their reverie is interrupted by an assault at the hands of a squad of trolls manning a giant Bludegon-Bow. Thor does okay in the fight, but Sif disappointingly is captured by the retreating trolls. So much for a new type of love interest.

Thor gives chase until he runs into Ulik, a massive rock troll wielding giant metal pounders, which are like a combination between brass knuckles and truncheons, capable of shattering a mountain. The madder Ulik gets, the stronger he becomes, and Ulik is quick to anger. Ulik is not an interesting character, he is a big dumb violent troll, but there is something neat about his concept, which is that he is Thor’s opposite Troll number. It elevates the Trolls and reflects interestingly upon big, dumb, violent Thor.

While Thor and Ulik prepare to fight, Sif is brought to Geirrodur, King of the Rock Trolls, last seen briefly in the Tale of Asgard presented in issue #101. The Troll King decides to use her against Thor and so she is gassed with the Vapors of Quietude and teleported away via the Tunnel of Wind Currents.

More alarming than this hostage-taking is the fact that Geirrodur has become aware that Thor has the mortal guise of Don Blake when he is on Earth. This increasingly irrelevant fact is nonetheless a rare secret. How could he know such a thing?

Thor and Ulik tussle, a roughly even match. Thor is actually losing the match when Ulik is teleported away. Thor is then met with a projected image of Geirrodur, who tells him that Sif is being held on Earth by Ulik, giving Thor a standard hero’s choice to stay and protect Asgard, or, leave and save Sif. Thor chooses the latter.

With Thor preoccupied, the Trolls open the Invasion Shaft, a path leading to the heart of Asgard, the culmination of hundreds of years of effort on the part of the Trolls. The invasion has begun!

By the way, in this war with the trolls, it appears that “Troll” is shorthand for “rock troll” but it may be that there is a single Troll state that includes multiple types of trolls. These trolls are not led by Seidring (made Troll King in issue #128), so either he reports to Geirrodur or there are multiple trollen nations. It is not clear.

First Appearance: The Vapors of Quietude, The Tunnel of Wind Currents, Ulik, Grak

Days of Thunder – January 1967: The Mighty Thor #136

The Mighty Thor! “To Become an Immortal!”
A Proud Phantasmagoria of Pageantry, Presented by: Stan Lee and Jack Kirby/ Delineated by: Vince Colletta/ Lettered by Artie Simek

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This is it! This is what the series has been building to from the beginning! Thor has taken Jane Foster to Asgard to become an immortal so that they two might wed!

And it all goes bad. Jane Foster freaks out over the hyper-aggressive weirdness that is Asgard, a city at war with Trolls. The violence, the monsters, the helmets, she pretty much finds everything about Asgard to be a point of anxiety. This isn’t the life she wanted.

Odin, wearing his largest helmet yet, gifts Jane the power of flight but her rational mind cannot handle the impossibility of flight-by-thought. Her doubt in Odin’s gift causes the gift to fail and for her to fail in the eyes of Odin.

Off to a bad start, Jane is given a test to prove her worth of being granted immortality. She is locked in a room with the Unknown, a dreaded monster of shadowy form. As Jane is a nurse and not an Asgardian warrior, she breaks down in abject fear, crying to Thor for help.

Thor rescues her, which is the final straw. Odin tells Thor that she has failed the test, that she is unfit to be an immortal. As Thor tries to argue her case, Jane interrupts,telling Thor off. “I won’t be a goddess! I won’t stay in Asgard! It is too horrible! Too unendurable! Don’t you realize how mad it is?!!” And with that final outburst, Odin teleports Jane far away from Asgard.

Before Thor can fully process the finality of what just happened, he is forced to deal with the fact that he accidentally let loose the Unknown. Odin sends him to Gundershelm, the only point where the Unknown can re-enter Asgard.

Indeed the Unknown appears. Thor fights the creature, but his heart is not in it. The creature is about to kill the god of Thunder when another warrior appears.

This newcomer’s blade turns the fight and together they defeat the monster. Thor greets his savior. It is Sif, last seen in issue #102’s Tales of Asgard. Since we last saw her, she has become a stern raven-haired warrior. Also, she is now apparently Heimdal’s sister, not Balder’s. Presumably, when Balder called her his sister in the past, he meant “like a sister” or possibly “sister-in-arms.”

Thor has not seen Sif since his youth, while Sif tells him plainly that she has loved him from afar. And Thor, who was earlier that day trying his damnedest to marry the mortal Jane Foster, is now apparently over that phase of his life. He tells Sif that he was a fool to turn his blind eye to her and the two walk off, hand-in-hand.

This is appallingly callous of Thor, but it really makes sense. Doctor Blake is the man that fell in love with Jane Foster, and very little of Doctor Blake remains in Thor. In fact, with Jane gone, there seems to be no reason left for Thor to ever revert to Blake.

And what of Jane? She finds herself in a hospital on the west coast, disoriented. After a moment she “remembers” that she is the new resident nurse at this hospital. She meets a Doctor named Kincaid who looks strikingly like Doctor Blake and it seems clear that Jane Foster, who fell in love with a shy doctor named Blake, not a bold warrior named Thor, has found herself in a new, better life, albeit one still defined by her relationship to a man. Goodbye Nurse Jane Foster.

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Days of Thunder – March 1964: Journey Into Mystery #102 part 2

Tales of Asgard, Home of the Mighty Norse Gods! “Death Comes to Thor”

Written By: Stan Lee/ Illustrated By: Jack Kirby/ Inked By: Paul Reinman/ Lettered by Art Simek

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This month’s installment begins with a note from the editors informing the readers that due to the popularity of the feature, “Tales of Asgard” has won a permanent place among the Marvel roster of fabulous features. Hooray!

This is another Boyhood of Thor story.  Young Thor seeks the three Fates, who tell him that he can win Odin’s enchanted hammer but he will have to meet death first. Thor is not well-versed in misleading fortune wording, and so he believes this means that he must die in order to receive Odin’s hammer, a fate he is determined to face with courage.

Later, Thor is brooding over his fortune while attempting to lift the hammer, when Balder the Innocent staggers in, wounded. He tells Thor that Storm Giants have kidnapped his sister, Sif. That is all Thor needs to hear, and he charges off to save Sif.

The young godling fights his way into the castle of Rugga, a king who desires immortality more than anything. Rugga doesn’t want a fight, and he explains to Thor that he made a deal with Hela, the goddess of death, to  exchange Sif for immortality. It is unclear from the text if this means that she is a living prisoner, or if Rugga killed her. Either way, having completed his deal, Rugga is happy to point Thor toward Hela.

Thor finds Hela in her domain. With her is Sif, a blond damseley sort,  bound at the wrists, with flowers in her hair.  I’m still not clear if she is meant to be dead or not.  She does not speak in this story.

Thor begs Hela to spare innocent Sif. He offers his life in exchange for the girl’s.   This offer impresses Hela, so much that she lets them both go.   Having completed this adventure in naked androcentrism, Thor has finally gained enough worth to lift the magic hammer.

First Appearance: Sif, Rugga, The Fates