Tag Archives: Mimir

Days of Thunder – September 1978 Thor Annual #7

“And Ever– The Eternals!”
Roy Thomas, Writer/Editor * Walt Simonson & Ernie Chan, Illustrators/ Glynis Wein, colorist/ Tom Orzechowski, letterer / Jim Shooter, Consulting Editor

thor-annual-7

Many of the stories to feature Thor outside of the main magazine have proven difficult to pin down when they happen in relationship to those stories, which tend to leave little room for downtime.  This story does not have that problem, explicitly taking place in the middle of The Mighty Thor #275.  This issue features the encounter between Thor and Mimir that was alluded to in that issue.

All the recent hubub regarding the end of the world has Thor thinking about how the world began.  The Asgardians have legends about such things, but so do the Olympians, as well as the mortals on Earth.  What about evolution?  It seems that he does not remember that he himself gave life to the first humans on Midgard.

Thor is musing on all of  these topics, but they are not what he asks Mimir about.  Instead, he wants to know if Ragnarok is going to take out Midgard when it goes, or if only Asgard is to be wiped out.  The full scope is not entirely clear.

Mimir tells Thor that he should already know how Earth is to be destroyed, but that he has forgotten.  Mimir then cites the events of Thor Annual #5, which goddammit, means I have to square that story with the other Thor storytelling that has already transpired.

At any rate, a thousand years ago, Thor was wandering around, far away from Asgard, when he stumbled upon a prisoner locked away in the middle of nowhere.  The prisoner said that its name was Dromedan, Master of Minds and Men, and that if Thor freed it, he would be granted wealth, women, and worlds to conquer.  Thor was ensorcelled by the prisoner, and tempted to free it, but he ultimately resisted and left it imprisoned.

Afterward, Thor went to Mexico and tried to get the natives to worship him.  This was met with hostility.  He soon ran into four colorfully dressed white men calling themselves “Eternals.”  These men, Druig, Virako, Ajak, and Valkin, asked to parlay with Thor, away from the “primitives.”

The Eternals explained that eons ago, powerful space gods known as Celestials had visited Midgard and performed breeding experiments on the local ape life to create three different breeds of intelligent life:  The Humans, The Eternals, and the Deviants.  At some point later, the Celestials wiped out their creations, forcing what people remained to rebuild their civilizations from scratch.  Now, the Eternals somehow sense that the Celestials are preparing to return for a third time.

Thor takes all of this at face value, but is shaken.  He asks if the first humans on Midgard were named “Aske and Embla”.  They do not know.  This leaves room for multiple interpretations.  Perhaps the Celestials actually only created the Deviants and the Eternals, while Thor created the humans with a branch of Yggrdasill.  Perhaps Yggrdasill served as some sort of catalyst for the Celestials.

It is also worth noting that the Eternals perceive Asgard and Olympus as existing in parallel universes to their own.

At any rate, Thor helps his new friends the Eternals subjugate the Aztecs.  They scare the humans into worshiping them so that these “primitives” might be “civilized”.  After a while, Thor gets bored and takes off for a while, before coming back and helping his buddies give the Mayans the same treatment.

Eventually, Druig turns traitor and releases Dromedan, who is a member of another terrestrial sub-race known as the  Mutates.  He also enlists the service of Tutinax the Mountain Mover, who is also a Mutate.  Druig wants to  enslave humans, not just civilize them.  And so he and his allies fight Thor and his allies.

Virako dies in the fight. But in the end Thor’s friends win the fight.  Afterward, Valkin uses mind powers to erase Thor’s memory of ever encountering the Eternals.  It is not clear why, but this  encounter was part of what the Eternals refer to as the Third Cataclysm.

Now, a thousand years later, Thor remembers.  Mimir informs him that the Celestials now walk the Earth so that they might judge it in fifty years time,  and that depending on how they judge it, they may wipe out civilization again.  Mimir implies, but does not outright state, that this will be the end of Midgard, not Ragnarok.

After a frustrated and despondent Thor leaves, Mimir takes a moment to delight in the secret knowledge that “The destiny of Thor be e’er entwined with that of his adoptive world– for reasons only Odin and Mimir do know!  And Odin, poor soul, be pledged ne’er to tell!”

First Appearance: Virako

Days of Thunder – September 1978 The Mighty Thor #275

“A Balance is Struck!”
Roy Thomas, Writer/ Editor * John Buscema & Tom Palmer, Illustrators * J. Rosen, Letterer/ B. Sharen, Colorist * Jim Shooter, Consulting Editor

thor-275

Balder is dead! Out of desperation, Odin sends an Asgardian by the name of Hermod the Swift to Hel to see if anything can be done to restore Balder. The Allfather lends Hermod his eight-legged horse, Sleipnir toward that purpose.

Odin tasks various Asgardians with protecting the Realm. Amongst them he tasks Sigyn, the wife that Loki has apparently had all this time, with guiding the aim of blind archer Hodor. She clearly states that while she loves Loki, she would defend Asgard even if it meant turning on him.

Thor briefly steps away to consult with Mimir.

Harris Hobbs and his team report on the events, but what’s more, Hobbs, who did a lot of studying of Norse mythology before his trip, has been predicting events before they have been happening. Not because of prophetic visions, but because things are matching what he read of Mythology.

Red Norvell hits on Sif some more, and as angry as that makes her, she refrains from slaying him. Butthurt, Norvell tells himself that Sif only likes Thor better than him because Thor is stronger than him. Loki offers to help him with his girl problems.

Loki takes Norvell to Jotunheim, land of the Giants but meets with an assemblage of Trolls and Dwarves. Geirrodur and Ulik are conspicuously absent. Thor somehow tracks them down, and Loki attacks his brother with what he claims to be very axe that Odin used to slay Ymir, eons ago. Since Odin did not slay Ymir, but eternally trapped him in a ring of fire, it seems clear that Loki is lying.

The two brothers battle while Norvell records the fight. Some time prior, Loki weaved an enchantment on Thor so that were he to enter Jotunheim, he would find his strength halved. Thor is no stranger to having his strength halved, but finds he need his full strength and so he uses Mjolnir to summon his Belt of Strength, last seen 184 issues prior. With it, he is able to defeat Loki as well as the trickster’s horde of Trolls and Dwarves.

Thor takes Norvell back to Asgard.  As Thor carries his unconscious brother, he asks Norvell to hold his belt.

When Hermod arrives in Hel, Hela tells him that Balder can be revived if all the world would weep for Balder’s passing. It comes to pass that all things do weep, all save for a Giantess named Thokk, who proclaims that Balder never did nothin for her. This is exactly what Hobbs said would happen, although he adds that there are rumors that Thokk is actually Loki in disguise.

Balder cannot be revived. In order to forestall his full death, Odin sacrifices some of his Odinpower, siphoning it into the fallen god’s body in order to bring Balder to a state of Odinsleep, surrounded by an Odinshield. This will perhaps stave off Ragnarok, but at the cost of weakening the All-Father.

This issue also makes it explicit that time passes at a different rate on Asgard than it does elsewhere. This, perhaps, can account for Odin’s difficulties with understanding time.

Also, Odin has started letting a pair of wolves follow him around wherever he goes.

First appearance: Hermod the Swift, Thokk, Sigyn

 

Days of Thunder – August 1978 The Mighty Thor #274

“The Eye– And the Arrow!”
Roy Thomas, Writer/Editor * John Buscema, Tom Palmer, Illustrators/ Instigators * Joe Rosen, Letterer * Bob Sharen, Colorist * Jim Shooter, Consulting Ed.

Thor 274

After taunting Thor with the prospect of the twilight of the Gods, Loki transforms into a rat and scurries behind a statue of Odin. Thor lifts the statue in order to get at his brother, despite the fact that lifting the likeness of Odin is sacrilege. It is while holding this statue that Odin returns astride Sleipnir, his eight-legged horse.

Odin has brought with him a blind warrior named Hoder. More strikingly, after all these binocular years, the All-Father now wears an eyepatch. Thor and Balder somewhat calm down Odin, who is angry about the statue and the mortals and Loki.

Thor wants to kill Loki in order to prevent Ragnarok. Odin says Thor can’t. Odin is surprised that Loki has been restored to Godhood.   Loki says Odin can not punish him again, and that Odin knows the reasons why. Odin, who normally would have plenty to be absurdly angry about, takes it all in relative stride, for he knows they face the end of all things.

Recently,  Odin’s ravens, Hugin and Munin, warned him that the time of Ragnarok might be approaching. Odin visited Mimir, seeking knowledge of how to prevent such an Armageddon. Mimir asked that Odin pay a price for such knowledge.

Unlike the price Mimir recently asked Thor to pay, the price demanded of Odin is actually costly: his right eye. Mimir hates Odin, for at the dawn of Asgard, Odin was responsible for Mimir’s beheading. Having taken petty payment, Mimir instructs Odin to travel to Hel to consult with Volla, the long-dead prophetess.

Odin finds Volla and asks her how, if possible, Ragnarok can be avoided. She tells him that Ragnarok is inevitable, due to Odin’s long-ago decree that the world will eventually need “fiery cleansing.” She suggests that it may be delayed if Balder can be protected, for his death shall signal the beginning of the end.

This is strange, for in the vision of Ragnarok that she saw, as depicted in issue #200, Balder fought alongside Thor in the battle of Ragnarok. Either her vision of the future has changed, or she is lying.

While in Hel, Odin encounters Hela. It is well-established that there are multiple afterlifes, and that the afterlife for the Aesir is Valhalla. This is now slightly reframed, as Hela is identified as the ruler of the Realm of the Dead known as Hel, and that she has semi-recently annexed Valhalla, something that Odin would take issue with, had he not more pressing matters. On the way back to Asgard, Odin happens upon Hoder, a blind wandering god, whom Odin offers to bring back to Asgard. He does so.

Soon after Odin finishes his tale, Sif and Hildegarde return from a seperate mission, tasked to them by the All-Father: They have brought back the long-absent Goddesses of Asgard. It is unknown where they were, or why they left, or how much of the female population of Asgard had been away while others such as Sif, Krista, and Hildegarde had remained.

Amongst the returning Goddesses is Frigga, the wife of Odin. Frigga shows a maternal affection for Thor, but in an aside, Hobbs explains to his cameraman Roger “Red” Norvell, that he doubts that Frigga is Thor’s mother; that according to mythology his mother was a giantess named “Jord.”

After Thor and Sif exchange a warm greeting, Odin, Frigga, and Thor depart to discuss the end of the world and also the presence of mortals in Asgard. Loki is not invited.

While they do that, the rest of the cast has a moment of downtime. Red clumsily hits on Sif and Balder tells him to fuck off. Balder then tells everyone that he is not worried about dying because as long as he remains in Asgard, he is invulnerable to any non-mistletoe thing. In his telling, it is Frigga that arranged this, but he likely misremembers, for it was Odin that made such happen.

Thanks to a psychic suggestion from Loki, Balder suggests that everybody throw their weapons at him. All the Asgardians do, despite Hobbs’ protests that they are being very stupid. Loki offers Hoder a special bow, with which Hodor uses to fire an arrow straight into Balder’s chest, fatally!

First Appearance: Sleipnir, Hoder, Hugin, Munin, Frigga, Njord

 

Days of Thunder – October 1976 The Mighty Thor #252

“A Dragon at the Gates!”
Len Wein, Writer/Editor/ John Bsucema & Tony DeZuniga, Illustrators/ Glynis Wein, Colorist/ Joe Rosen, Letterer

Thor 252

Thor tries to find his father by again seeking the aid of Mimir. Unlike last time,  Mimir now demands very specific payment for his services: The Cyclopean Ruby Eye of the Dragon Guardian of of Realm Below.

Thor finds the task dishonorable, but decides he has little choice. He journeys down into the Realm Below, adjacent to the territory of the Trolls and eventually finds the Dragon of the Ruby Eye. However, before he can fight the dragon, he discovers that his old foe Ulik has come here at the exact same time, seeking the exact same item.

Ulik claims that the survival of the Troll Empire itself depends on the procurement of the eye. Neither warrior is willing to forfeit the Eye, and so they fight each other for it. Ulik wins the fight, tossing Thor off a cliff into a lake of fire!

Days of Thunder – October 1975 The Mighty Thor #240

“When The Gods Make War!”
  Hearken ye, Believers, to a tale that only Rascally Roy Thomas could have plotted, Sal Buscema and Klaus Janson could have drawn, John Costanza could have lettered, Phil Rachelson could have colored… …And somewhere along the line embattled Bill Mantlo got handed the job to script. So be it! Edited by: Roy Thomas, Marv Wolfman & Len Wein, Triumvirate of Tamperers

Thor 240

Thor returns to Asgard, only to discover that all of its inhabitants have become weak and lethargic. The Vizier has already returned, and it is unclear if he has relayed the news of Sif’s passing. Thor cannot bear to bring up that bit of sad news at this time.

At the dawn of time as it is poorly understood by the inhabitants of Asgard, Odin knelt before the Mimisbrunnen, the Well of Wisdom, and bartered with Mimir, the Well’s guardian, for knowledge. Odin was granted knowledge, but at a secret price. Now, the Vizier summons a vision of Mimir, so that they might track down Odin.

Mimir tells Thor where Odin has gone, seemingly gratis. He also relays to Thor some Egyptian mythology wherein Horus is the Hero god and Seth is the villain god.

Thor returns to Midgard to find his father. At the site of the pyramid, he finds Jane Foster, who took the first plane out after catching the news.

Thor strikes at the base of the pyramid with Mjolnir until Horus reveals himself. Neither god is much for open communication, and the two soon find themselves fighting. They fight until a figure emerges from the pyramid. It is Odin, now going by the name Atum-Re!

The Egyptian Gods claim that Odin was not merely the All Father to the Norse, but that he was the Old One that sired the Gods of Egypt. Whether that is true or not, right now he does not recognize Thor and is prepared to fight him.

First appearance: Seth, Atum-Re, Mimir